An ash log being split with wooden wedges

An ash log being split with wooden wedges

Was-A-Log

Products that Celebrate the quality of English grown timber that is normally destined to be firewood. The wood is sourced from local forest contractors, coppice workers and tree surgeons. It is harvested in amounts that are generally too small for saw mills to process economically.

It's split in half.... 

It's split in half.... 

in half again... 

in half again... 

and half again. 

and half again. 

The traditional method of working most materials is to start with an idea or plan in mind and then to search for the material qualities that are suitable. Unfortunately if the material has an unseen flaw (especially in the case of wood) The material is often put aside and another piece sourced. With Was-A-Log I source the wood from a pool of local tree specialists and contractors. I split the still green (unseasoned) log with wooden wedges and when the internal structure is revealed I plan the most amount of objects I can make from it, paying consideration to the qualities of the material. If it has knots I can use them for features for the Lightscapes, good straight grain is used for the Tethers  and rolling pins, smaller patches of good grain can be used for MementoHome4 or hook collars.  Other pieces are made into Treen, Birdy or Spills for fire lighting. The shavings are used for slowing down the drying process of the wooden objects or animal bedding. Almost nothing goes to waste. 

Most products in the range can be traced back to their origin. Each product comes with a location code. select the right location on the Provenance map page and see the woodland, or area, where your product grew for many years.

As this project has now taken over a large part of my life I have made a seperate website for Was-A-Log, click here to visit it.

 

Turned stock drying

Turned stock drying

Working methods:

The secret to working in the traditional greenwood method is extremely sharp tools. Much time is spent honing the tools which is not just good for preparation but also gets one into the right state of mind. The tools are powered by arms, fingers or legs and this physical connection with the work gives a great insight into the condition of the wood being worked. I can't explain the shear pleasure I get when, on the pole lathe, I am cutting what is called 'angel hair', thin tightly curved shavings which are produced during the finishing cut and when all the elements of the work and process are just right.


The shave horse in use

The shave horse in use

A froe, block, hand axe and club

A froe, block, hand axe and club